Titanic Real Time

102 years ago today, the RMS Titanic sank in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, taking more than fifteen hundred souls with it.

Stanley Seeger’s collection of art to go up for auction next month. [x]

Lot 3 - A cut-glass Claret jug from RMS Titanic.

A cut glass claret jug rescued from the RMS Titanic when it sank, is another of the lots on offer at the Sotheby’s sale, the glass jug bears the engraving RMS Titanic.

Wallace Hartley’s violin, was displayed at Henry Aldridge and Son Auctioneers in Devizes, Wiltshire, fetched a record £900,000 today.
Mr Aldridge said: “It symbolises love, with a young man strapping it to his body because it was an engagement present from his fiancee”
Via DailyMail

Wallace Hartley’s violin, was displayed at Henry Aldridge and Son Auctioneers in Devizes, Wiltshire, fetched a record £900,000 today.

Mr Aldridge said: “It symbolises love, with a young man strapping it to his body because it was an engagement present from his fiancee

Via DailyMail

Violin that was played as Titanic sank undergoes CT scan to prove authenticity before going to auction. 
Via DailyMail.

Rare photo taken on board Mackay Bennett in 1912 will be auctioned off next month in Devizes, Wiltshire. [x]

The ship’s priest, Reverend Hind, is seen with body bags stacked on the windswept deck during funeral, records show that 166 of 306 bodies retrieved by Mackay Bennett were buried at sea.
Most of the victims dropped into the Atlantic were believed to have been chosen because they had no means of identification or were third-class passengers and therefore could not afford a funeral.
The Mackay Bennett spent five days retrieving bodies from the wreck site and had to request for a second vessel to join it because there were so many. This photo shows that the deck was pretty much full up with the victims.The Mackay Bennet was a Canadian cable laying ship and the owners of the Titanic, White Star Line, contracted it at a rate of £300 a day to recover the bodies.It left Halifax, Nova Scotia, on April 17 and arrived at the wreck site on April 21.
The crew conducted burials at sea on the evenings of April 21, 22 and 23 and then of the afternoon of April 24, when it is thought the picture was taken.
In an account of the burials, Reverend Hind later wrote: ‘Anyone attending a burial at sea will most surely lose the common impression of the awfulness of a grave in the mighty deep, the wild Atlantic may rage and toss but far below in the calm untroubled depth they rest in peace.’

Rare photo taken on board Mackay Bennett in 1912 will be auctioned off next month in Devizes, Wiltshire. [x]

The ship’s priest, Reverend Hind, is seen with body bags stacked on the windswept deck during funeral, records show that 166 of 306 bodies retrieved by Mackay Bennett were buried at sea.

Most of the victims dropped into the Atlantic were believed to have been chosen because they had no means of identification or were third-class passengers and therefore could not afford a funeral.

The Mackay Bennett spent five days retrieving bodies from the wreck site and had to request for a second vessel to join it because there were so many. This photo shows that the deck was pretty much full up with the victims.The Mackay Bennet was a Canadian cable laying ship and the owners of the Titanic, White Star Line, contracted it at a rate of £300 a day to recover the bodies.
It left Halifax, Nova Scotia, on April 17 and arrived at the wreck site on April 21.

The crew conducted burials at sea on the evenings of April 21, 22 and 23 and then of the afternoon of April 24, when it is thought the picture was taken.

In an account of the burials, Reverend Hind later wrote: ‘Anyone attending a burial at sea will most surely lose the common impression of the awfulness of a grave in the mighty deep, the wild Atlantic may rage and toss but far below in the calm untroubled depth they rest in peace.’

Pawnbroker pays £15,000 for Titanic ‘relics’ and finds they’re worth £1.2million.

Mark Manning bought the collection for £15,000. The artefacts include an inherited piece of ship’s wooden staircase and fragment of steel hull. 

The anonymous collector who sold the relics claimed part of the collection which included a fragment of the doomed ship’s metal hull, had been gifted to him by George Tulloch.

x

Titanic’s Aft Grand Staircase dome, now laying on the Atlantic Ocean floor.

Titanic’s Aft Grand Staircase dome, now laying on the Atlantic Ocean floor.

futurejournalismproject:

Titanic Sinks Four Hours After Hitting Iceberg
Survival Facts: If you were a third class passenger, your chance of survival was 25 percent
First class passengers had a 62 percent survival rate. Second class passengers had a 41 percent survival rate. The crew had a 24 percent survival rate.
Fun Fact: What happened to the iceberg?
Bonus: Images of the Titanic wreck made by stitching together hundreds of optical and sonar images collected by robots via Scientific American Woods Whole Oceanographic Institute, and National Geographic.
Image: April 16, 1912 edition of the New York Times.

futurejournalismproject:

Titanic Sinks Four Hours After Hitting Iceberg

Survival Facts: If you were a third class passenger, your chance of survival was 25 percent

First class passengers had a 62 percent survival rate. Second class passengers had a 41 percent survival rate. The crew had a 24 percent survival rate.

Fun Fact: What happened to the iceberg?

Bonus: Images of the Titanic wreck made by stitching together hundreds of optical and sonar images collected by robots via Scientific American Woods Whole Oceanographic Institute, and National Geographic.

Image: April 16, 1912 edition of the New York Times.

We’ve dressed up in our best and are prepared to go down like gentlemen.
Benjamin Guggenheim [Aboard the Titanic as she was sinking - April 15, 1912]

Titanic survivors aboard the RMS Carpathia.